Trust Your Touch with CoppaFeel!

Pretty much within the hour of being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, I decided I wanted to do something with what I was anticipating was going to be the most negative experience of my life. Not long before I finished treatment, I got in touch with CoppaFeel! – a breast cancer awareness charity set up by the inimitable Kris Hallenga. Kris had been diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 23. A late diagnosis meant that by the time she was diagnosed, her breast cancer was already Stage 4. There is no stage 5. Kris’ cancer had become what was known as secondary, or incurable, breast cancer.

Kris was determined that she wanted to do everything she could to stop more young women ending up in the situation that she was in. She realised that early detection of breast cancer saves lives and, along with her twin sister Maren, embarked on a campaign to educate the nation to that tune. CoppaFeel! was born.

I first encountered Kris when I saw her documentary “Dying to Live” during my time at university. I was blown away by the woman I saw before me, and I knew as soon as I was diagnosed that I wanted to join in the mission to stamp out late detection of breast cancer that Kris had started. Little did I know that CoppaFeel! would worm its way into my heart and life in ways I could never have imagined back in the summer of 2015.

I became a Boobette for the charity – one of around 100 women under 35 who have all been affected by breast cancer in one way or another, whether through a personal diagnosis, a scare or a hereditary connection with the disease – about 18 months ago. This group of women is beyond phenomenal. The army of the boob world, the Boobettes go into schools, colleges,  workplaces, universities, community centres, WI’s – basically anywhere that will have them – to bang on about bangers and to stress how important it is to know your own body. I am proud every single day to be surrounded by such a tour de force for breast awareness – and essentially self care. These women have been to hell and back and have chosen to tell the story. I have the utmost admiration for every single one of them.

Then a few months back, I was approached about becoming a trustee for the charity. Much like Liam Neeson in Taken, I had a very select set of skills. Skills I had acquired over a very long short career, that meant I would be a good fit for the board. Social media skills – check; marketing skills – check; previous breast cancer – check; down with the kids – TBC. But of course, I couldn’t say no. I was incredibly honoured to be asked to come into a role which meant I was able to work with the insanely talented team they have in the office and help drive this remarkable charity forward.

And on Friday, these guys made history. History that I was lucky enough to be a part of and that made my feminist side really bloody thrilled. They created an ad campaign which led to the first female nipple being aired on TV. Vogue wrote an article about the campaign. It was featured in the top spot on the BBC news app. Huffington Post, Refinery29 and The Independent all got in on the action too. And I’m so honoured that I got to be part of this. Once again, I got my boob (and where my boob used to be) out in the name of breast cancer awareness.

So isn’t it about time you trust your touch? Give you norks a feel today because knowing your boobs could save your life. Check out CoppaFeel! to see what you should be looking and feeling for.

Life, Lemons and Melons

Hello friends. So today, I have some pretty big news. This has been in the works for quite some time. There have been setbacks and restarts but I think, I’m finally there with the preparation, and so I’m turning to you guys to help.

About a year ago, I had an idea, formed as the best of them are, just as I was nodding off one night. I’ve always wanted to write a book, and suddenly the basis for one presented itself to me. I decided I wanted to write a book about what it’s like to get breast cancer when you’re 26, and you’ve just started getting help for the long lasting problems your brain has given you over the course of your adult life. I am, of course, talking about my old pal depression.

It had reached a point where my dark days were getting deeper and lasting for longer periods. I knew what it was like to reach rock bottom and I didn’t like it there. I wanted help. I didn’t want to hang out in the dark orifices of my brain. They were not nice places to be. I finally made the decision to go to the doctors. I started CBT. I went on medication. And two days before my final session of CBT, I was told that I had breast cancer.

Shit. I’d just spent a few months figuring out who I was and how I could deal with the darkness when it came along, and I was thrown another curve ball in the shape of a tumour growing in my right breast. Oh great, thanks.

Life, Lemons and Melons is the story of figuring out life when it hands you a whole heap of lemons and you don’t have the energy to make lemonade or even reach for the gin. It’s a funny story about things that aren’t that funny and a coming of age story that came a few years later (or earlier) than expected. It’s about mortality, health, the pressures of the modern world, trying to be positive when your heart feels like it’s being repeatedly trodden on by an elephant and finding humour in getting diagnosed with breast cancer aged 26 when you carry a black dog around with you every day.

It’s essentially about the life of every twenty something – but with some added mental anguish and the mild inconvenience which is cancer thrown into the mix. A recipe for disaster? Maybe. A good story? Hopefully.

So why am I telling you about this? Am I about to tell you the book has been snapped up by a publisher in a heated battle between two of the big wigs? Well, no. Not quite. Despite a lot of interest from publishers thanks to my wonderful agent, Robert, it turns out I don’t have a big enough social media following for publishers to be interested in me. They loved the story, they loved the proposal, they loved my writing. But the social media following (or lack thereof) was too big a sticking point for them.

But this is something I have to do. It’s something I have to do for me. I have this book inside me and it is burning to get out. Practically clawing at my insides to make it’s way from my brain to my keyboard. So, I’m going to do it myself. I’ve decided to self publish. But I need your help. And it turns out, the way you can help me is by giving me your hard earned dollar. I’m crowdfunding for the project. I have a heap of options for whatever your budget is, and for every budget you get a copy of the book (whether hard or digital) including my words and images created by my insanely talented and perpetually brilliant pal Georgia Wilmot. And 10% of any profits made will go to my friends at CoppaFeel! so you’ll be helping them help more people get into the healthy boob-checking habit of a lifetime too. I also hope that this book will help anyone who’s ever heard the words “it’s breast cancer” and who’s ever had a fight with their brain.

So how can you support for Life, Lemons and Melons? Head on over to Kickstarter and choose a pledge then share the campaign with your friends, family, colleagues, dog walker etc. If we hit my target of £3k within 30 days, the book will happen. I’ll have to sit down and write it, but as the outline is all there and ready to go, I’m hopeful I’ll just be able to “write the shit out of it” as my friend said. If we don’t hit the target, you won’t lose a penny and I’ll crawl into a hole and pretend this never happened drop the idea, knowing I tried everything I could.

THANK YOU in advance for your help, whether it’s a pledge or a share. I can almost feel the dream of holding this book in my hands becoming a reality.

 

Things I Wish People Knew About Surviving Breast Cancer

More and more people every year are being diagnosed with cancer, in one form or another. Whether it’s lifestyle, environment, diet or any other factors that is causing the increase is very much up for debate, and not a debate I have enough authority to cast my opinion on. But with every new cancer diagnosis, research and treatments are vastly improving too. Now, if you’re diagnosed with primary breast cancer, you have an 80% chance of surviving 10 years after your diagnosis. Fewer people (though still too many) are dying of cancer but we still don’t know  what to do with survivors. The NHS is often too stretched to support people with the mental, physical and emotional turmoil that cancer leaves behind and not equipped to provide the kind of spiritual support people need after going through a life changing experience. So more and more people are surviving cancer, but their needs are often not understood – even by those closest to them.

In the 17 months since I finished treatment, there’s so much I have learned about “surviving” cancer and I thought it might be good to share these with you – so if you’re undergoing treatment, or know someone who is, you might get a better idea of what it’s like when you’re released back into the world. If you’ve been through treatment, some of these might seem pretty negative – but I think it’s important to normalise what life’s like after cancer so that if you feel any of these things (and you might think they’re all WRONG), you won’t feel alone and scared and worried and all the other emotions you experience in The Aftermath of this Life Changing Big Deal thing that happened to you. Buckle up campers,  this is a long read.

1. When I say “I’m tired” I don’t just mean I didn’t get enough sleep last night. It’s not because of the antidepressants I take. It’s not because I need to eat more veg, or get more exercise (but I should probs get a bit more, shouldn’t we all?). It’s because these days, post treatment, I reach a point where I splutter to a grinding stop like a car that’s been running on fumes for the last 20 miles. I crunch to a standstill with zero ability to continue, no matter how hard I try. Nausea. Headaches. Dizziness. Feeling faint. The works. There’s tiredness – which I was very familiar with before cancer – and then there’s fatigue and comparing tiredness to fatigue is like comparing cricket to walking on the moon.

I know lots of people who’ve had cancer treatment don’t find that their fatigue lasts as long as mine has and I am a) jealous and b) want to know all their secrets, but for many people who’ve been through cancer treatment fatigue lingers for various reasons.  The day my friend Izzy came round and did all the dishes I’d let build up because I was knackered was one of the best gifts she could have provided. She told me she found it therapeutic but I know she was doing it because she knew what a difference  it would make to me. These things make a difference, no matter how long it is since you’ve finished treatment.

2. Survivors guilt is real. Real and pervasive. Every time I hear about another person, whether I’ve met them, kind of half know them or have never heard of them at all, who has been diagnosed with secondary breast cancer or have died from it, I get a little crack in my heart. These cracks deepen the more of this news I hear. I wonder why I was, for now at least, more lucky than them. I wonder why I deserved to survive. I feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility to them to be better, to do more, to make the most of the life that I’ve been given. I feel guilty for still talking about my experience because at least the active part of treatment is over for me. What about the thousands of other people for whom treatment will never end? They don’t want to hear me wanging on about this when I’m lucky enough to have wrapped up my treatment.

There are people literally fighting for their lives and sometimes I feel like I should sit down and shut up because my opinion of cancer isn’t relevant because it’s not trying to kill me. I remember when my article was in Red I got shouted down by a handful of people who thought my experience wasn’t valid and that they should have been telling the stories of people with secondaries instead of me. So often I don’t understand why I am still here and so many of my amazing Boobette sisters are not. It’s a bloody minefield – especially if you’re prone to excessive rumination like I am. Survivors guilt is real and will bring up a range of unruly emotions in you. Accept them and remember that you’re doing the best you can.

3. Cancer never really leaves you. Long after you’ve finished treatment, cancer has a way of rearing its ugly head and infiltrating on the life you’re trying to rebuild. Whether that’s annual checkups at the hospital that give you palpitations, nightmares about it coming back, scares about recurrences and the feelings of fear, sadness, heartbreak and everything else you feel are constant reminders of what happened to you. Sometimes I have flashbacks to things, traumatic moments of when I was in treatment, that I’ve blacked out. Sometimes these thoughts hit me like a punch to the temple and other times they just wash over me. I can never judge which way I’m going to react or how I’m going to feel when this happens. But they tell me this is normal.

Don’t forget about what happened to us. We don’t need sympathetic head tilts but don’t panic if we tell you we’re still thinking about cancer 5 years after diagnosis. Ask how we are – and not in a perfunctory greeting way. Really ask. If we’re ok, we’ll tell you. But if we need to talk, that question will feel like a life ring being thrown out to us in the middle of a black and stormy ocean, where we’ve been floundering miles from the shore.

4. I have strong opinions about the language around cancer. I HATE THE FIGHT ANALOGY. I hate the idea that if you die from cancer you “lose”. How can you lose when you’re giving everything you have? How can you say people have “lost their battle” when they were never armed with the right infantries to battle with. Cancer is like Danerys on Drogon, leaving devastation in its path but cancer is never the victor. And it doesn’t matter how hard you fight. Even the best will in the world, the strongest positive mental attitude doesn’t stop cancer cells from multiplying – it’s medicine that does that. And we are not in control of how our bodies react to medicine (whether traditional or alternative, whatever your choice). People die. Don’t use euphemisms. It does them a disservice.

5. I think about death. I think about my death. I make jokes about dying. And that’s ok. I don’t need you to tell me not to talk like that or to “stop thinking that way”. Talking this way is one of my self defence mechanisms and it’s one I really, really need. It might seem negative or pessimistic but it’s the way I’m dealing with this. I know it might be hard for you to think about my cancer coming back. I know it might make you uncomfortable when I crack jokes about not making it to 40 years old, but if I’m laughing, you can laugh too. Laughter is the thing that has saved my life. The reality is that cancer might not just make the one stop in my life and I’m coming to terms with that. I know it’s hard for you too but it’s how I’m going to survive the uncertainty.

6. It doesn’t end after radiotherapy finishes. Having had triple negative breast cancer means I don’t have any further lines of defence against breast cancer but for so many, taking daily Tamoxifen, a hormone suppressant for five or ten years after finishing active treatment is a reality, meaning their treatment continues long after that last blast of radiotherapy. Other breast cancer’s need to be treated with a drug called Herceptin which is usually injected in the months following active treatment. Then there’s the fear, checkups, post-traumatic-stress, depression, anxiety that comes with life after treatment. There’s so much more to cancer than just the treatment part of things.

7. I don’t give a hoot where you keep your damn handbag. And putting a heart on your wall to create breast cancer “awareness” is a sure fire way to make me give you a lecture on how to actually check your tits. Memes about how much you hate cancer are useless and to be honest, kind of offensive sometimes, unless they’re saying that you hate cancer and we all need to do our own bit to make sure we’re doing what we can to make sure we get treatment asap if we do get cancer. That was a long sentence but what I mean is, I’m only interested in memes that tell us what we should be looking out for when it comes to signs and symptoms of cancer, rather than just an “I hate cancer” meme. Dude, I’m pretty sure no-one likes it much.

8. Finding yourself might not be as easy as you hope, but you’ll get there a little at a time. And you’ll surprise yourself frequently by your ability to pick yourself up and get on with shit even when you feel you cannot any more. I still have no idea who I am after cancer, so much so that when I am asked for an interesting fact about myself, it’s all I have to do to stop myself from blurting out “I HAD CANCER” because I feel like it’s a huge part of who I am/was/will be in the future, but also, that’s not ideal when meeting new people. They’d think I was bonkers. They can wait to find that out.

So you’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer…

First off, hi. Hello. Welcome to this pretty shitty club. I’d say we’re glad to have you here, but we aren’t. I wish you didn’t have to be here. I wish you could have carried on living in a WC (without cancer) world. But sadly that’s not to be the case. It’s shit that you’re here, but I also want to tell you that it’s going to be OK. Treatment is going to be hard and you’re going to cry and shout and laugh and cry again and you’ll find brightness in the places you’ve never expected to find it. It is a pretty crap club to be in, the “I’ve had breast cancer” club. But by the same token, you’ll find some pretty special people on your, X-Factor word, journey through and beyond breast cancer.

It’s almost two years since I heard the words that changed the path of the following 18 months and are still having an impact on my every day life. Almost two years since the kindly man with the big bow tie (who in my mind has morphed into Trevor Macdonald, because I haven’t seen him in a while) told me that it was cancer growing in my right breast. I’m becoming a bit further removed from Cancerland every day, though truth be told, you never really get that far away. If I’m being honest, looking back on those days is a bit like looking through a steamed up mirror. I can see myself behind the condensation but it’s in a bit of a haze, like another world. My outline is the same but I can’t make out the features of my face or that life anymore. But I remember how scared I was. How overwhelmed I was. How anxious I was. How I morphed into survival mode – wanting to know what was to be done and wanting to get the hell on with it. And if I can help one person deal with the road ahead of them after hearing those perspective shifting words, I want to do it. So here’s a few things you might be interested to know if you’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer.

  1. It will feel like a bad dream for a while. Definitely the first few days. Certainly the first few months. Even now I feel like cancer was a weird thing that maybe happened to someone else in my body. I remember waking up at my parents the day after I was diagnosed, and thinking that I must have made the whole thing up. I felt like a liar. Had my husband not been sat alongside me when the news was delivered, I think I would have convinced myself I was lying.
  2. You’re going to feel a lot of things. But it’s important to say you might not feel them straight away. You also might not feel the things you expect. I did not cry the day I got diagnosed. I did not shout or scream or anything. I made jokes in the surgeon’s office. When the breast care nurse told me “I think it’s OK to cry”, I laughed. I cried the next day for about two minutes. And the day after that, I cried for a little longer. Then I didn’t really feel anything for a while. I never got angry about the fact I had cancer. I never asked “why me?”, but if you do, that’s OK, you know? Don’t ever beat yourself up for having emotions about cancer and what is doing to your life.
  3. Things will move quicker than you can imagine. If you’re in the UK, once you’ve been diagnosed, you have to begin treatment within one month (or you did at the time of writing). Within three weeks of getting diagnosed, I had seen my surgeon and decided I was going to have a mastectomy, and had my surgery. Know that even when things are moving at lightening speed, you can still ask questions. You can slow things down, even just a little. If there’s anything you’re unsure about, ask. Your team are there to help you make sense of what’s happening. Remember that breast care nurses (BCN’s) are angels sent from heaven* to guide you through the tumultuous months of your treatment. They’re there if you have questions, there if you feel alarmingly unwell, there for guidance, there if you have some kind of surgery related crisis. They’re just there. Use them. You’ll need the support
  4. Surgery is not as terrifying as you might expect. I had never been under a general anaesthetic when I had my mastectomy. Practically a pro now, mind, but I have never been as scared as I was in my life before that first surgery. I cried as the anaesthatist put my cannular in. But within seconds of them administering the drugs (and wow are they good drugs, yo!) I was asleep and then I was awake in what felt like another few seconds, and it was all over. Your surgeons are experts. Trust in them. They’ve done these surgeries a million times. They’re on your side. Don’t forget that.
  5. If you have to have chemo and you’re anything like me, you’ll find that it is one of the hardest things you have ever had to do. I cried the night before every chemo without fail – horrible snotty sobs. But as with most things, bad things pass. Chemo is a long old slog, but when you get to the other side of it, you won’t believe how quickly it was over. This too shall pass will probably become your mantra, for nausea, for the inability to have regular poo, for fatigue, for fear, for losing hope, for the waves of sadness, for neutropenia, for delayed chemos. For everything. No matter how hard things get, you’ve got a really good track record for surviving bad days. This too will pass. Say it with me – “this too will pass”. I wrote some tips for surviving chemo if you want to check them out.
  6. Radiotherapy is tiresome and you’ll still need propping up. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is the lesser-talked-about sibling of chemotherapy. It’s not as brutal, has fewer side effects and is usually over in about a 6th of the time it takes for chemo to end. Sessions can be anything from 3-6 weeks (I believe – I had 3 weeks) so it’s not as long a haul, but going to hospital every day to get blasted by radioactive waves is pretty dull. Be sure to listen to your team and MOISTURISE your skin LOTS to protect it. Get right on into the armpit there too. And don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it (not with moisturising, I mean in general). Radiotherapy is hard too. Don’t feel guilty for still needing a hand here and there.
  7. You’ll laugh at things you never thought you’d laugh at. You’ll find brightness in the times you thought you’d never see daylight again. When you feel at your absolute worst and you think you can’t feel any more ill, you’ll start to feel better. You’ll feel like your losing your mind sometimes. You’ll feel like you’ve got it all in hand sometimes. Sometimes you will lose your mind a little bit. Sometimes you really will have everything under control. You’ll gather a lot of stories that you think are hilarious and then you’ll tell them to a bunch of people expecting to get a laugh and no-one will know where to put themselves. That’s OK. You’ve got to laugh to survive. Oh and losing your hair? Horrible. Really horrible, no bones about it. But losing your lady garden and not having to shave your legs for months is a surprising bonus. And having hair again when it grows back is one of the best feelings in the world.

There’s so much other stuff I want to tell you. So many other things I want to say but I know how overwhelmed you’re feeling right now and I don’t think it’s fair for me to add to it. Whatever you take from this blog post, know this – it’s OK. It’s OK to not be OK. It’s OK to be fine. Cancer treatment is hard, but you know what? It’s OK. And sometimes it’s not. That’s OK too.

* Not guaranteed. But they may as well be.

Self Confidence in the Face of Cancer

Self confidence is something I’ve often grappled with. Like most people these days, I scroll through Instagram, Facebook, the Internet as a whole and I’m subjected to images of photoshopped bodies, made to look smaller, more taut, more toned. I see adverts every second breath telling me how to get glossier hair, I’m subjected to images that suggest women are little more than a pair of knockers. Or magazine articles that exclaim “Fix your eyebrows, find love!”. These articles, adverts, posts, messages all tell me how I “should” look.

So what do you do then, when you find yourself squidgy round the edges because a gruelling healthcare routine has left you with little time or energy to put on your running shoes? When you no longer have any hair at all, let alone hair that you need to make thicker? Or when one of the parts of your body that defines you as a woman is taken away from you? When you haven’t a single eyebrow hair to speak of, when you couldn’t make your brows “on fleek” if you tried. How do you find self confidence if you don’t even recognise the face, the body, looking back at you in the mirror? When you’re as far away from how you “should” look, as you possibly can be?

Self confidence is a funny old thing and often in the UK it gets confused with arrogance, much like it’s close sibling, self belief. People would far rather pick at things they don’t like than look at the things they do like. So next time you’re brushing your teeth or your hair, or figuring out if you really can wear that skirt with that top (by my rules, you deffos can, I know I can’t see, but you can), I’d like you to do something for me. Look at yourself. Really look at yourself and find one thing you love about your face. Maybe you’ve got beautiful eyes, maybe you’ve got really full lips, maybe your cute button nose is a real family trait. Perhaps you can look at your body and be proud of the strength you see in your biceps or calves or maybe you’ve got stretch marks that prove you’re a mummy and you love them because they show you carried another human for 9 months. These things are what make you, you. They tell your story. They don’t have to be perfect. But if you can come to terms with them now, it won’t matter what’s thrown at you in the future.

I stepped out in a swimming costume the other day for the first time in 7 months. Chemo and surgery had both played a part in stopping me from doing one of my favourite things. I didn’t wear a hat and I dont yet have a prosthetic designed for swimming. I was terrified, worried about what people would think of me if they noticed how lopsided my boobs were. Scared that people would judge me and my bald head and my tired eyes. I was nervous I wouldn’t be able to swim fast or for long any more. All of these things came down to my self confidence. And there were two things my friends said to me that gave me pause, and helped me park my insecurities. “No one will notice what you look like because they’ll all be too worried about what they look like” and “you may be being treated for cancer, but you’re still a swimmer. That hasn’t changed”.

And when I got in the pool, it didn’t matter. I did get some weird looks, but I get weird looks when I’m not bald. And I reminded myself that it’s OK to look like a cancer patient. Because that’s what I am at the moment. It’s not all I am, but it’s a big part right now. And that’s OK.

For my whole life, I’ve been conflicted by wanting to avoid having my photograph taken, but being desperate to take – and be involved in – a shot to preserve a memory (I made a hilarious typo when I wrote that sentence first time – see if you can guess what it was). And I’ve spent a lot of time avoiding mirrors too. So why then did I appeal for someone to take professional photos of myself when I looked less like myself than I ever could have envisaged? Because cancer has changed my approach to self confidence in one way or another.

That’s not to say I’m any more confident than I was BC (before cancer) but I guess the goalposts have moved or the parameters have changed. Whichever cliche you want to adopt. I have a list of things I won’t moan about when I don’t have cancer and some of the more superficial of them include “bad hair days” or “looking like shit”. If I’ve got hair, eyelashes, eyebrows and skin that doesn’t look like tracing paper, I’m a step ahead of cancer me. And I wanted to remember the strength I’ve found during my cancer treatment. To celebrate the me that’s finally become brave enough to be out without a hat on and be comfortable with it. So here’s a couple of the photos I had taken the other week. So I can look at them in the future and remember this version of self confidence when I can’t find another. If I hadn’t been diagnosed with breast cancer, there is no way I would have bared my chemo face and my scarred body to a stranger (who I now hope is a friend). I hope these photos, especially the ones of my mastectomy scar offer some strength to other breast cancer sufferers. I bloody salute you all.

Photos by the INIMITABLE Georgia Devey Smith. Mega thanks to Georgia for taking these photos – I’m sure you’ll agree she is exceptionally talented and I feel very privileged to have been photographed to her. Thanks also to my homegirl Isobel Kennedy for doing my makeup – but more on that next time (with more photos of my mug. SOZ)

Scars and Stories

I’ve always been pretty accident prone. When I was a kid, I was forever falling over, walking into things and falling off things. As a result, I’m covered in little scars. Tiny little white flecks across my body that remind me of a place and time in my life. When I look at my knees (which admittedly, I don’t do often because that would be weird) I can see the scar from the day I fell off the wall at school. I remember the thick scab that covered the wound as my skin fused together again. When I look in my face in the mirror, I see the single thin line from my forehead to my chin, an outline of the story where I dragged the cat down the stairs by her tail and got my comuppance for it.

As I grew older, I got a few scars too. My TB jab, reminding me of the secondary school I hated and the bullies who threatened to punch it. I have a scar on my left breast from where the fibroadenoma I had a few years ago was removed. I’ve learned over the last month or so I’ve got two tiny scars on the back of my head. And there are other marks too. And all of them link together in a tapestry of history, a timeline of events where my body has suffered some kind of trauma and recovered itself. I’ve always been proud of these scars. Every time I bash myself on the doorway as I rush from A to B, I like it when a bruise blooms underneath my skin, a mark of a moment. It makes a story to tell. And I deal in stories.

Now I have a whole range of new scars, new tales to relay. From where they inserted a line in my left bicep that travelled straight to my heart so drugs could be administered easily and blood could be removed without stabbing around for a vein. Come to think of it, my thick, rigid vein, damaged by the drugs – admittedly not a scar per se, but an external reminder of internal healing. The tiny pinpricks on my stomach from injection after injection to rebuild my immune system after every battering it took from chemo. The three tiny little tattoos to mark where they’ll be blasting me for radiotherapy. The slash across my chest where they took out the cancer, and eventually my breast tissue, leaving behind an envelope of skin, a stark reminder of what the last eight months have been about – as if I needed one.

But these scars are different. Part of me wishes I could leave them behind, that they didn’t exist so I wouldn’t have to carry them with me forever. So that when this chapter of my life is done, I can move on and forget about it. But that’s just fantasy. There are many more scars – those that aren’t physical that I’ll carry with me, so even if there were no scars casting patterns across my skin, there’d still be those to contend with. I’ve always marvelled at the scars I got before I had breast cancer. I’ve always been proud and fascinated by my body’s ability to heal and regenerate.

I guess the scars I have from getting breast cancer weren’t caused by my own clumsiness. I didn’t walk into cancer. Didn’t fall over it because I wasn’t paying attention. These scars happened because my body turned against me. Because my breast tried to kill me. That’s something that I have to come to terms with, just one of the mental cuts I have to allow to heal. At the same time though, they tell a story too. That same story of regeneration and healing as all my other scars, just on a larger scale. They show a strength I never knew I had. A resilience I never imagined I’d be able to find. So I guess I should be proud of them. And proud of everything they represent. I guess I just have to give my mind time to scab over and heal before I can accept the physical traces of cancer.

Photo by Georgia Devey Smith