Things I Wish People Knew About Surviving Breast Cancer

More and more people every year are being diagnosed with cancer, in one form or another. Whether it’s lifestyle, environment, diet or any other factors that is causing the increase is very much up for debate, and not a debate I have enough authority to cast my opinion on. But with every new cancer diagnosis, research and treatments are vastly improving too. Now, if you’re diagnosed with primary breast cancer, you have an 80% chance of surviving 10 years after your diagnosis. Fewer people (though still too many) are dying of cancer but we still don’t know  what to do with survivors. The NHS is often too stretched to support people with the mental, physical and emotional turmoil that cancer leaves behind and not equipped to provide the kind of spiritual support people need after going through a life changing experience. So more and more people are surviving cancer, but their needs are often not understood – even by those closest to them.

In the 17 months since I finished treatment, there’s so much I have learned about “surviving” cancer and I thought it might be good to share these with you – so if you’re undergoing treatment, or know someone who is, you might get a better idea of what it’s like when you’re released back into the world. If you’ve been through treatment, some of these might seem pretty negative – but I think it’s important to normalise what life’s like after cancer so that if you feel any of these things (and you might think they’re all WRONG), you won’t feel alone and scared and worried and all the other emotions you experience in The Aftermath of this Life Changing Big Deal thing that happened to you. Buckle up campers,  this is a long read.

1. When I say “I’m tired” I don’t just mean I didn’t get enough sleep last night. It’s not because of the antidepressants I take. It’s not because I need to eat more veg, or get more exercise (but I should probs get a bit more, shouldn’t we all?). It’s because these days, post treatment, I reach a point where I splutter to a grinding stop like a car that’s been running on fumes for the last 20 miles. I crunch to a standstill with zero ability to continue, no matter how hard I try. Nausea. Headaches. Dizziness. Feeling faint. The works. There’s tiredness – which I was very familiar with before cancer – and then there’s fatigue and comparing tiredness to fatigue is like comparing cricket to walking on the moon.

I know lots of people who’ve had cancer treatment don’t find that their fatigue lasts as long as mine has and I am a) jealous and b) want to know all their secrets, but for many people who’ve been through cancer treatment fatigue lingers for various reasons.  The day my friend Izzy came round and did all the dishes I’d let build up because I was knackered was one of the best gifts she could have provided. She told me she found it therapeutic but I know she was doing it because she knew what a difference  it would make to me. These things make a difference, no matter how long it is since you’ve finished treatment.

2. Survivors guilt is real. Real and pervasive. Every time I hear about another person, whether I’ve met them, kind of half know them or have never heard of them at all, who has been diagnosed with secondary breast cancer or have died from it, I get a little crack in my heart. These cracks deepen the more of this news I hear. I wonder why I was, for now at least, more lucky than them. I wonder why I deserved to survive. I feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility to them to be better, to do more, to make the most of the life that I’ve been given. I feel guilty for still talking about my experience because at least the active part of treatment is over for me. What about the thousands of other people for whom treatment will never end? They don’t want to hear me wanging on about this when I’m lucky enough to have wrapped up my treatment.

There are people literally fighting for their lives and sometimes I feel like I should sit down and shut up because my opinion of cancer isn’t relevant because it’s not trying to kill me. I remember when my article was in Red I got shouted down by a handful of people who thought my experience wasn’t valid and that they should have been telling the stories of people with secondaries instead of me. So often I don’t understand why I am still here and so many of my amazing Boobette sisters are not. It’s a bloody minefield – especially if you’re prone to excessive rumination like I am. Survivors guilt is real and will bring up a range of unruly emotions in you. Accept them and remember that you’re doing the best you can.

3. Cancer never really leaves you. Long after you’ve finished treatment, cancer has a way of rearing its ugly head and infiltrating on the life you’re trying to rebuild. Whether that’s annual checkups at the hospital that give you palpitations, nightmares about it coming back, scares about recurrences and the feelings of fear, sadness, heartbreak and everything else you feel are constant reminders of what happened to you. Sometimes I have flashbacks to things, traumatic moments of when I was in treatment, that I’ve blacked out. Sometimes these thoughts hit me like a punch to the temple and other times they just wash over me. I can never judge which way I’m going to react or how I’m going to feel when this happens. But they tell me this is normal.

Don’t forget about what happened to us. We don’t need sympathetic head tilts but don’t panic if we tell you we’re still thinking about cancer 5 years after diagnosis. Ask how we are – and not in a perfunctory greeting way. Really ask. If we’re ok, we’ll tell you. But if we need to talk, that question will feel like a life ring being thrown out to us in the middle of a black and stormy ocean, where we’ve been floundering miles from the shore.

4. I have strong opinions about the language around cancer. I HATE THE FIGHT ANALOGY. I hate the idea that if you die from cancer you “lose”. How can you lose when you’re giving everything you have? How can you say people have “lost their battle” when they were never armed with the right infantries to battle with. Cancer is like Danerys on Drogon, leaving devastation in its path but cancer is never the victor. And it doesn’t matter how hard you fight. Even the best will in the world, the strongest positive mental attitude doesn’t stop cancer cells from multiplying – it’s medicine that does that. And we are not in control of how our bodies react to medicine (whether traditional or alternative, whatever your choice). People die. Don’t use euphemisms. It does them a disservice.

5. I think about death. I think about my death. I make jokes about dying. And that’s ok. I don’t need you to tell me not to talk like that or to “stop thinking that way”. Talking this way is one of my self defence mechanisms and it’s one I really, really need. It might seem negative or pessimistic but it’s the way I’m dealing with this. I know it might be hard for you to think about my cancer coming back. I know it might make you uncomfortable when I crack jokes about not making it to 40 years old, but if I’m laughing, you can laugh too. Laughter is the thing that has saved my life. The reality is that cancer might not just make the one stop in my life and I’m coming to terms with that. I know it’s hard for you too but it’s how I’m going to survive the uncertainty.

6. It doesn’t end after radiotherapy finishes. Having had triple negative breast cancer means I don’t have any further lines of defence against breast cancer but for so many, taking daily Tamoxifen, a hormone suppressant for five or ten years after finishing active treatment is a reality, meaning their treatment continues long after that last blast of radiotherapy. Other breast cancer’s need to be treated with a drug called Herceptin which is usually injected in the months following active treatment. Then there’s the fear, checkups, post-traumatic-stress, depression, anxiety that comes with life after treatment. There’s so much more to cancer than just the treatment part of things.

7. I don’t give a hoot where you keep your damn handbag. And putting a heart on your wall to create breast cancer “awareness” is a sure fire way to make me give you a lecture on how to actually check your tits. Memes about how much you hate cancer are useless and to be honest, kind of offensive sometimes, unless they’re saying that you hate cancer and we all need to do our own bit to make sure we’re doing what we can to make sure we get treatment asap if we do get cancer. That was a long sentence but what I mean is, I’m only interested in memes that tell us what we should be looking out for when it comes to signs and symptoms of cancer, rather than just an “I hate cancer” meme. Dude, I’m pretty sure no-one likes it much.

8. Finding yourself might not be as easy as you hope, but you’ll get there a little at a time. And you’ll surprise yourself frequently by your ability to pick yourself up and get on with shit even when you feel you cannot any more. I still have no idea who I am after cancer, so much so that when I am asked for an interesting fact about myself, it’s all I have to do to stop myself from blurting out “I HAD CANCER” because I feel like it’s a huge part of who I am/was/will be in the future, but also, that’s not ideal when meeting new people. They’d think I was bonkers. They can wait to find that out.

14 thoughts on “Things I Wish People Knew About Surviving Breast Cancer

  1. Emily says:

    Thank you for this. I’m coming to the end of my treatment (excluding 5-10 years of Tamoxifen) and am feeling all of these emotions! It is nice to hear that I am not the only one.

  2. Chris Evans says:

    I too am goingthrough cancer, I was told by my cousin (who has been through it) don’t think of it as A FIGHT, ‘just go with it and ask questions’ I now know exactly what she meant. I agree totally with all that has been said before. People who have not been here haven’t got a clue so please don’t say I’i know how you feel’ YOU DONT!

  3. Ree says:

    Wonderful article and so so true of my own thoughts! I cannot bear the statements, you’re going through a journey, you are so brave! I am not brave, I had no choice.
    Thank you again

  4. lesley donald says:

    True words . Great article. The tiredness is something u learn to manage as the years go by. I always remember being told listen to your body. Something i never did pre cancer but have done since 2nd cycle of chemo. I am now 11 yrs on from diagnosis. I began to feel human again 2 yrs after finishing hormone treatment. I had chemo, rads & 6 yrs of tamoxifen.

  5. Caralyne says:

    A surprisingly honest opinion. Im relatively new to the Breast cancer scene and found this really helpful. Thank you.
    It’s good to know that others feel the same about the unbelievable annoying and useless memes!!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s