So you’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer…

First off, hi. Hello. Welcome to this pretty shitty club. I’d say we’re glad to have you here, but we aren’t. I wish you didn’t have to be here. I wish you could have carried on living in a WC (without cancer) world. But sadly that’s not to be the case. It’s shit that you’re here, but I also want to tell you that it’s going to be OK. Treatment is going to be hard and you’re going to cry and shout and laugh and cry again and you’ll find brightness in the places you’ve never expected to find it. It is a pretty crap club to be in, the “I’ve had breast cancer” club. But by the same token, you’ll find some pretty special people on your, X-Factor word, journey through and beyond breast cancer.

It’s almost two years since I heard the words that changed the path of the following 18 months and are still having an impact on my every day life. Almost two years since the kindly man with the big bow tie (who in my mind has morphed into Trevor Macdonald, because I haven’t seen him in a while) told me that it was cancer growing in my right breast. I’m becoming a bit further removed from Cancerland every day, though truth be told, you never really get that far away. If I’m being honest, looking back on those days is a bit like looking through a steamed up mirror. I can see myself behind the condensation but it’s in a bit of a haze, like another world. My outline is the same but I can’t make out the features of my face or that life anymore. But I remember how scared I was. How overwhelmed I was. How anxious I was. How I morphed into survival mode – wanting to know what was to be done and wanting to get the hell on with it. And if I can help one person deal with the road ahead of them after hearing those perspective shifting words, I want to do it. So here’s a few things you might be interested to know if you’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer.

  1. It will feel like a bad dream for a while. Definitely the first few days. Certainly the first few months. Even now I feel like cancer was a weird thing that maybe happened to someone else in my body. I remember waking up at my parents the day after I was diagnosed, and thinking that I must have made the whole thing up. I felt like a liar. Had my husband not been sat alongside me when the news was delivered, I think I would have convinced myself I was lying.
  2. You’re going to feel a lot of things. But it’s important to say you might not feel them straight away. You also might not feel the things you expect. I did not cry the day I got diagnosed. I did not shout or scream or anything. I made jokes in the surgeon’s office. When the breast care nurse told me “I think it’s OK to cry”, I laughed. I cried the next day for about two minutes. And the day after that, I cried for a little longer. Then I didn’t really feel anything for a while. I never got angry about the fact I had cancer. I never asked “why me?”, but if you do, that’s OK, you know? Don’t ever beat yourself up for having emotions about cancer and what is doing to your life.
  3. Things will move quicker than you can imagine. If you’re in the UK, once you’ve been diagnosed, you have to begin treatment within one month (or you did at the time of writing). Within three weeks of getting diagnosed, I had seen my surgeon and decided I was going to have a mastectomy, and had my surgery. Know that even when things are moving at lightening speed, you can still ask questions. You can slow things down, even just a little. If there’s anything you’re unsure about, ask. Your team are there to help you make sense of what’s happening. Remember that breast care nurses (BCN’s) are angels sent from heaven* to guide you through the tumultuous months of your treatment. They’re there if you have questions, there if you feel alarmingly unwell, there for guidance, there if you have some kind of surgery related crisis. They’re just there. Use them. You’ll need the support
  4. Surgery is not as terrifying as you might expect. I had never been under a general anaesthetic when I had my mastectomy. Practically a pro now, mind, but I have never been as scared as I was in my life before that first surgery. I cried as the anaesthatist put my cannular in. But within seconds of them administering the drugs (and wow are they good drugs, yo!) I was asleep and then I was awake in what felt like another few seconds, and it was all over. Your surgeons are experts. Trust in them. They’ve done these surgeries a million times. They’re on your side. Don’t forget that.
  5. If you have to have chemo and you’re anything like me, you’ll find that it is one of the hardest things you have ever had to do. I cried the night before every chemo without fail – horrible snotty sobs. But as with most things, bad things pass. Chemo is a long old slog, but when you get to the other side of it, you won’t believe how quickly it was over. This too shall pass will probably become your mantra, for nausea, for the inability to have regular poo, for fatigue, for fear, for losing hope, for the waves of sadness, for neutropenia, for delayed chemos. For everything. No matter how hard things get, you’ve got a really good track record for surviving bad days. This too will pass. Say it with me – “this too will pass”. I wrote some tips for surviving chemo if you want to check them out.
  6. Radiotherapy is tiresome and you’ll still need propping up. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is the lesser-talked-about sibling of chemotherapy. It’s not as brutal, has fewer side effects and is usually over in about a 6th of the time it takes for chemo to end. Sessions can be anything from 3-6 weeks (I believe – I had 3 weeks) so it’s not as long a haul, but going to hospital every day to get blasted by radioactive waves is pretty dull. Be sure to listen to your team and MOISTURISE your skin LOTS to protect it. Get right on into the armpit there too. And don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it (not with moisturising, I mean in general). Radiotherapy is hard too. Don’t feel guilty for still needing a hand here and there.
  7. You’ll laugh at things you never thought you’d laugh at. You’ll find brightness in the times you thought you’d never see daylight again. When you feel at your absolute worst and you think you can’t feel any more ill, you’ll start to feel better. You’ll feel like your losing your mind sometimes. You’ll feel like you’ve got it all in hand sometimes. Sometimes you will lose your mind a little bit. Sometimes you really will have everything under control. You’ll gather a lot of stories that you think are hilarious and then you’ll tell them to a bunch of people expecting to get a laugh and no-one will know where to put themselves. That’s OK. You’ve got to laugh to survive. Oh and losing your hair? Horrible. Really horrible, no bones about it. But losing your lady garden and not having to shave your legs for months is a surprising bonus. And having hair again when it grows back is one of the best feelings in the world.

There’s so much other stuff I want to tell you. So many other things I want to say but I know how overwhelmed you’re feeling right now and I don’t think it’s fair for me to add to it. Whatever you take from this blog post, know this – it’s OK. It’s OK to not be OK. It’s OK to be fine. Cancer treatment is hard, but you know what? It’s OK. And sometimes it’s not. That’s OK too.

* Not guaranteed. But they may as well be.

2 thoughts on “So you’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer…

  1. tango40cats says:

    Hello, I feel I have just sneaked into your life. I came across you on instagram and had a look at your blog. I’m 52 and was diagnosed in March. I’ve had 5 chemos so far. I love the way your write and how you see things and it rings true with me. Such an honest and positive outlook. Thank you …. Love and Light Sindy xx

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